Welcome to Innovation Focus

March 2018

Conference Highlights

Cutting Edge Lipidomics at LUMC Seminar with the Key Opinions Leaders from the Field

SCIEX organized the Lipidomics Workshop – Applications in Food and Life Sciences, jointly with the Leiden University Medical Center LUMC and DSM. The event was hosted at the LUMC itself in Leiden, Netherlands on 1st and 2nd February 2018.

More than 100 researchers joined the seminar to learn about the latest applications for mass spectrometry in lipids analysis. The key opinion leaders of the field attended this event to present how they are advancing their research with this technology, including the SCIEX Lipidyzer™ Platform, and discuss the future in Life Science and Food analysis.

Marco Eijsackers, SCIEX Vice President and General Manager EMEAI, opened the event with the Key Opinion Leader, and co-organizer, Martin Giera, Head Metabolomics Group, Associate Professor from Leiden University Medical Center, and our partner Erwin Kaal from DSM. The experts of the field each presented their work. You can find the list of invited speakers and the agenda on the event page.

This event is the 1st first of its kind and shows SCIEX as a leader in the lipidomics field. Watch the thank you video from Martin Giera to all the attendees.


Customers Talk, We Listen​

Make The Most Of Your Time In-and Out-of The Lab?

In a survey related to Informatics you told us that the top three items related to system troubleshooting included:

  • Minimizing the time it takes to troubleshoot instrument problems when an issue arises
  • Maximizing the availability of instrument health status
  • Minimizing the amount of time it takes to recover from a system fault

We understand that your time is valuable. We heard you say in our recent Day in the Life survey that you do the work you do because you are motivated and passionate about your science and the impact it has on life. Instrument uptime plays a significant role in the amount of time you can spend doing the things you love.

StatusScope Remote Monitoring allows a mass spectrometer user to determine…

We understand that your time is valuable. We heard you say in our recent Day in the Life survey that you do the work you do because you are motivated and passionate about your science and the impact it has on life. Instrument uptime plays a significant role in the amount of time you can spend doing the things you love.

StatusScope Remote Monitoring allows a mass spectrometer user to determine…

What is happening with the system

  • Warnings to avoid downtime
  • Alerts of failures
  • Sample queue problems

Faster resolution of problems

  • Remote fixes
  • Quicker dispatch

How your assets are used

  • Utilization reporting
  • Asset management
  • Capacity planning

This article in the SCIEX community focuses on the role of remote monitoring in lab productivity. Take a virtual tour.

Spend more time solving life’s problems.

Feature Article

SelexION

Celebrating Over 60 Refereed Journal Articles Using SelexION® Differential Mobility Separation Technology

The SCIEX SelexION device is an innovative achievement in differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS). This DMS tool delivers highly-selective, robust and powerful ion separation that significantly enhances your quantitative and qualitative performance.

2017 marked a milestone for SelexION technology with over 60 published journal articles. This is in addition to nearly 100 presentations at the American Society for Mass Spectrometry conference!


Survey Results​

What Motivates You To Do What You Do In Your Current Role?

In a recent IAB survey called “A Day in the Life”, we asked “What motivates you to do what you do in your current role?” The responses to this question were awe-inspiring.

Each of us hold different principles about our jobs and need different things to feel fulfilled and rewarded in what we do every day. For some, that might be the challenge or interest of working on something new, a passion to find solutions to difficult problems, or helping benefit others. For others, it may be the love of science, the interaction with colleagues/customers, the salary or the personal achievement that comes from the role.

Motivation is vital to our individual successes. It is an important element to achieve satisfaction and happiness in the place where we work. Whether it’s a requirement that pushes us forward or a reward that pulls us onward, understanding what motivates us helps us to realize our goal.

When looking at all the responses that came in for this question, more than half of you responded that you are motivated because the role you are currently in is challenging/interesting. Many of you also responded that helping benefit others is what motivates you most of all. Our advisors also found motivation because of their passion to find solutions to difficult problems.

Thank you for your responses, it was truly rewarding for us to go through them, share them internally and relate them to our own jobs. Identifying what motivates your day-to-day routines helps guide the future development of our products and services.


Tips and Tricks​

At What Point Does One Decide to Perform Routine Cleaning on a Mass Spectrometer?

If you observe these problems below, they indicate that the system might be contaminated. Clean the mass spectrometer front end.

Significant loss in sensitivity

Increased background noise

Additional peaks that are not part of the sample, that appear in full scan or survey scan methods

Routine Cleaning (to help prevent instrument contamination, perform routine cleaning regularly every day before use)

  • Remove the Source
  • Remove the curtain plate
  • Clean the curtain plate with cleaning solution
    • Cleaning solution: 50/50 – MeOH/H20 most common
      • Dependent on sample type and mobile phase
  • Allow the plate to air dry or hand dry with a lint-free wipe, ensure no lint is on the plate before re-installing
  • While the curtain plate is removed, wipe the exterior of the orifice plate using a dampened wipe and the cleaning solution
    ** Do not cross over the orifice aperture with the dampened wipe **
  • Re-install curtain plate and source

Advanced QJet® Ion Guide Cleaning (follow guides and refer to SCIEX University to clean Q0)

Recommended Tools:

Hand Held Microscope – 30xCleaning Solution – 50/50 MeOH/H20 – most common
* Dependent on sample type and mobile phase *
Lint-free Wipes and Anti-static Swabs
Lint-free Wipes p/n 1013134
Anti-static Swabs p/n 1017396
1.5m Allen Key
Ring Pliers 
  • Vent Mass Spectrometer following the procedure in the service guide
  • Remove the source, curtain plate, orifice plate, and QJet
  1. Curtain plate
  2. Orifice plate
  3. QJet ion guide
  4. Oring
  • Clean the curtain plate as mentioned in routine cleaning, for a dirtier curtain plate, hot water and a cleaning brush can be used lightly
  • Turn the orifice plate over inside a 500ml beaker and allow the cleaning solution to drip through. Examine the orifice aperture with the hand-held microscope to check for clogs
  • Examine the orifice aperture with the hand-held microscope to check for clogs
  • Using the Anti-static swabs swap the QJet
  • Optional to remove IQ0 lens for maximum cleaning. Remove 2 screws and ring clip

To re-install the QJet, line up the guiding pins shown below

  • If the QJet is installed properly there should be a bounce

•Re-install clean and dry orifice plate
•Re-install clean and dry curtain plate
•Power on the Mass Spectrometer following the instructions in the site guide

GEN-MKT-09-7517-A

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