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Rescheduling a Schedule I substance, and the Delta-8 controversy

Did you know that in the US, drugs and other chemicals are classified into 5 distinct categories depending on the drug’s acceptable medical use and its potential for abuse or dependency?  Drugs federally classified as Schedule I substances by the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) are considered to have the highest potential for abuse and for creating severe psychological and/or physical dependence. In addition to heroin, LSD and MDMA (ecstasy), cannabis is classified as a Schedule I substance in the Controlled Substance Act of 1970, which means it has no approved medical usage.

Uploading data for use in OneOmics suite

There are two options for data storage when working with the OneOmics suite. You can store your data either within the SCIEX Cloud platform in the Data Store, or you can store data in BaseSpace (Illumina) and link your BaseSpace account with the SCIEX Cloud platform....

sMRM Pro Builder template tutorial

The sMRM Pro Builder template is an Excel-based tool that can help you implement large panels of analytes in your lab. The Excel sheet will take your preliminary experimental results and compute retention times, retention time window widths and dwell time weighting to optimize your targeted assay.

Rescheduling a Schedule I substance, and the Delta-8 controversy

Rescheduling a Schedule I substance, and the Delta-8 controversy

Did you know that in the US, drugs and other chemicals are classified into 5 distinct categories depending on the drug’s acceptable medical use and its potential for abuse or dependency?  Drugs federally classified as Schedule I substances by the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) are considered to have the highest potential for abuse and for creating severe psychological and/or physical dependence. In addition to heroin, LSD and MDMA (ecstasy), cannabis is classified as a Schedule I substance in the Controlled Substance Act of 1970, which means it has no approved medical usage.

Thailand cannabis legalization

Thailand cannabis legalization

Thailand has become the first southeast Asian country to legalize cannabis for medical use. Cannabis was originally introduced into Thailand from India, and until it was outlawed in the 1930s, it was historically used as a kitchen condiment, medicine and source of fiber.

Computing protein confidence with improved accuracy by reassessing peptide confidence during protein grouping

Computing protein confidence with improved accuracy by reassessing peptide confidence during protein grouping

ProteinPilot software 4.0 and higher releases include a new method for calculating protein confidences that improves reliability at the end of protein lists. Figure 1 shows a simulated example that demonstrates how more accurate protein confidence is computed. Figure...

What’s in your citrus oil?

What’s in your citrus oil?

Craig Butt explains a non-targeted omics approach to characterizing and profiling compounds in citrus oil Read time: 4 minutes There is increasing interest among consumers in the benefits of natural products containing citrus beyond the traditionally known benefits of...

The honey sting

The honey sting

As a consumer it’s hard for me not to feel inundated with claims that our food is “all-natural” or “chemical-free” or that we should buy certain “superfoods” for their health benefits.  We read labels and trust that the product we are buying is what we are truly...

A rising star in food allergen research: proteomics of shellfish allergen

A rising star in food allergen research: proteomics of shellfish allergen

It’s important to know what you’re eating, especially if you suffer from a food allergy.

About 220 million people worldwide live with a food allergy.1 These numbers, along with the complexity and severity of conditions, continue to rise. In America, there are about 32 million food allergy sufferers—5.6 million of those are children under the age of 18.2.2 That’s 1 out of every 13 children, or about 2 in every classroom. From a financial perspective, the cost of food allergy childcare for US families is up to $25 billion