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What are the differences between EPA methods 533 and 537.1?

With the risk of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination and accumulation in humans and wildlife on the rise, it is important to continuously improve and demonstrate capabilities for accurate and precise low-level quantification in research and...

Uploading data for use in OneOmics suite

There are two options for data storage when working with the OneOmics suite. You can store your data either within the SCIEX Cloud platform in the Data Store, or you can store data in BaseSpace (Illumina) and link your BaseSpace account with the SCIEX Cloud platform....

What is the difference between MRM3 vs MS/MS/MS (MS3)?

The MRM3 workflow and the MS3 scan are functionally the same QTRAP system scan, but used with different goals in mind.  The main difference is how these scans are used in the whole MS workflow. With MS3 scans, you can use these in a data dependent mode for discovery...

How do I define the experimental design (the metadata) for my SWATH acquisition study within the OneOmics suite? What are the requirement for replicates?

How do I define the experimental design (the metadata) for my SWATH acquisition study within the OneOmics suite? What are the requirement for replicates?

In quantitative Omics research, the goal is to understand which analytes (protein or metabolite) are perturbed between experimental conditions; therefore we carefully design our studies to explore these questions. The algorithms used within the Assembler application...

The risky business of aflatoxins in milk

The risky business of aflatoxins in milk

If you’re in the dairy or food testing business, you know the threat aflatoxins pose. Aflatoxins are a type of mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus parasiticus, aspergillus flavus , and rarely aspergillus nomius.1 These are likely the most extensively researched group of mycotoxins because of their adverse health effects.2 What’s more, they are widely found in a variety of crops, namely maize, tree nuts, and spices. Believed to be primarily caused by rising temperatures and humidity, these naturally occurring fungi grow on crops in the field, or during storage of feed and raw materials, where they can potentially produce toxins that enter the food chain.

The honey sting

The honey sting

As a consumer it’s hard for me not to feel inundated with claims that our food is “all-natural” or “chemical-free” or that we should buy certain “superfoods” for their health benefits.  We read labels and trust that the product we are buying is what we are truly...

A rising star in food allergen research: proteomics of shellfish allergen

A rising star in food allergen research: proteomics of shellfish allergen

It’s important to know what you’re eating, especially if you suffer from a food allergy.

About 220 million people worldwide live with a food allergy.1 These numbers, along with the complexity and severity of conditions, continue to rise. In America, there are about 32 million food allergy sufferers—5.6 million of those are children under the age of 18.2.2 That’s 1 out of every 13 children, or about 2 in every classroom. From a financial perspective, the cost of food allergy childcare for US families is up to $25 billion

Detect the Signal, Not the Noise

Detect the Signal, Not the Noise

  Improving the specificity and selectivity of your assay Your LC-MS assay is only as good as its power to discern your target compound from everything else. Standards dissolved in clean solvents can make beautiful assays, but analytes in real-world samples can behave...

Make the Leap from GC to LC-MS/MS

  Choosing the best technique for your analysis can be tough. Should you go with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)? That’s the key question. That’s why we’re here to help. The Limitations of...

Uncovering the Links Between Childhood Growth, Body Size, and a Woman’s Risk of Breast Cancer

Uncovering the Links Between Childhood Growth, Body Size, and a Woman’s Risk of Breast Cancer

Welcome to the second in a series of posts marking International Women’s Day, and our ongoing support of World Cancer Research Fund. This installment is a review by Dr. Jennifer Baker, of her work, that, with the help of a WCRF grant, is studying body size and its links to breast cancer. Dr. Baker, Lead Investigator at Denmark’s Frederiksberg Hospital, has a Ph.D. in Human Nutrition from Cornell University. Her research focuses on clinical epidemiology.